Beyond the Apron - Katie Coss

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Katie Coss - @ktcoss27

Executive Chef - @husknashville

 

Live: Thompson’s Station  

Work: Husk Nashville  

Katie Coss brings an inventive and undeniably creative presence to her role as Executive Chef at Husk Nashville. She is always looking for new ways to incorporate her love for home-grown ingredients into her craft, and inspires those who work with her to do the same. Her dedication to making dishes that are truly an experience for people is one of the many things that make her (and Husk Nashville) stand apart from the rest.

 What brought you to Nashville? 

After learning so much at Husk Charleston, I was presented with an opportunity to move to Husk Nashville. The chance to continue to work for amazing chefs and be closer to home was more than enough to convince me that this was the right move. 

 

When your best friend visits, where can you be found?

The most quintessential Nashville food experience to me is Arnold’s, and I think it’s important everyone has that experience when they first get here. 

 

Favorite Nashville eateries?  

Some of my favorite places to eat are closer to my house in Franklin, TN; but when I get a night in town, my go to’s are Dozen Bakery and City House.

 

Go to spot for drinks? 

My Front Porch

One change you’d like to see in Music City?

More Dolly Parton. 

 

What inspired you to become a chef? 

A love for true home-grown ingredients. Growing up on and around farms, that style of cooking is something I took for granted and am happy to get to share with people now. Opening someone’s eyes to what real food is—that’s very rewarding.

 

Advice you would you give aspiring chefs?

Keep your head down and ask questions at every turn. Never be afraid to ask what someone is working on. If a chef is plating something, pay attention—even if it is not your station. You never know when you might need to help. You want to make sure you are doing it the way the chef wants it. 

 

Thing you are most excited about at work right now? 

We have had a lot of big changes at Husk, and right now just getting all of these young guys involved in the creative process has been the most rewarding. Having people run up to you with so much excitement and tell you about what they want to work on always makes me smile. Empowering them to think about dishes and think about flavors has led to a level of excitement in this kitchen that has been very positive.

 

What should people be ordering at Husk Nashville right now?

We always have our staples such as the cheeseburger and the fried chicken, and you can’t go wrong with them. What excites me most though has been trying to incorporate unique ingredients, even if we can only run them for two or three nights. You may come in and we may be running a mushroom toast that is amazing, but may not be on past that night. It is amazing because we bake the bread fresh and we use the best ingredients. Those sorts of dishes are things I hope to keep rotating to give people an exciting and unique experience. 

Beyond the Apron - Jake Howell

Each month, we’ll chat with one of Nashville’s chefs about what life is like beyond the apron.      


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Jake Howell 

Executive Chef / Owner, Peninsula

Live: East Nashville / Work: East Nashville

 

When an opportunity to open Peninsula presented itself here in Nashville, this Executive Chef didn't hesitate to make the move.  A desire to "know more" spurs his creativity in the kitchen and allows for us to enjoy dishes not found anywhere else in Music City. 

Where do you dine when the apron is off? 

Hoang Tofu, InterAsian Market & Deli, Husk, Urban Cowboy, Bastion, Ed’s Fish and Pizza House and Hugh Baby's

Go to spot for drinks?

I don’t really drink so I don’t spend much time in bars. I really enjoy hanging out at Cowboy and my girlfriend loves the drinks there. Dino’s is another spot we end up at from time to time.    

What inspired you to become a chef?

Nothing particularly romantic. I think the thing that propelled me forward in cooking was the desire to know more. I’m most inspired by the idea that I can constantly evolve and grow as a cook.

Advice you would you give aspiring chefs?

Have a life outside of cooking. Finding separation is crucial to being happy and healthy in this industry.

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What brought you to Nashville?

I moved here to open Peninsula.

How can Nashville improve?

Summer could be a bit shorter.

Thing you are most excited about at work right now?

I’m excited about a lot of things. Our staff is awesome. My Sous, Cody, is an incredibly talented person and is doing some really special stuff in the kitchen. Everything is really starting to click and I can’t wait to see in what direction the food will go next. The insane pork we’re getting from Wedge Oak Farm--it’s just ridiculously good. We just got in a big batch of aji dulce peppers from Sounding Stone Farms that I’m crazy about.

What should people be ordering at Peninsula right now?

We’re serving a grilled mushroom and uni dish that I’m super into right now, or the txistorra.

Beyond the Apron - Terra B. Nelson

Each month, we’ll chat with one of Nashville’s chefs about what life is like beyond the apron.      


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Terra B. Nelson @terrabnelson

Pastry Chef, Butcher & Bee

Live: West Nashville / Work: East Nashville

 

Drawing her inspiration from a mixture of international flavor and grandma's cooking, the treats this new mom is concocting, will have your tastebuds begging for more.  You can find her delectable creations at Butcher and Bee in the East Nashville.  Stop by and say hello, and trust us, you don't want to skip desert!

Where do you dine when the apron is off? 

There are so many great restaurants around Nashville, but I have a few favorites that I always like to take people to when they are visiting; City House and Nicky’s for dinner, and I love Dozen Bakery for coffee and breakfast.  And if you are looking for a classic great burger, you have to check out Hugh Baby’s, it’s dangerously good.

Go to spot for drinks?

It’s a little bit of a drive, but I love going out to Arrington Vineyards, buying a bottle of wine and bringing a picnic.  It’s great scenery and they have free live music on the weekends.  I also like the bar at Gray and Dudley, and the patio at Butcher and Bee is a great spot for a cocktail and appetizers.     

What inspired you to become a chef?

I grew up watching my aunts and Mamaw in the kitchen and always loved to cook, but I never really thought of it as a career until college.  My junior year of undergrad I backpacked around Europe and volunteered in Greece for a summer.  I came back from that trip and decided to go to Culinary School!

Advice you would you give aspiring chefs?

Travel and eat as much as possible, the more you get out in the world and explore flavors, the more you will find your own food voice.  I feel like some of the best flavor combinations and techniques I’ve learned have come from food I’ve eaten on trips.  

What brought you to Nashville?

My husband got a job offer and we moved down about three years ago.  I always liked visiting friends in Nashville, so I was pretty excited when we got the chance to move here.

How can Nashville improve?

Fixing 440 would be a great start...

Thing you are most excited about at work right now?

We are getting some really beautiful peaches in.  Nashville is such a great location for sourcing fantastic produce; it makes my job so much easier having delicious fruit coming in daily. 

What should people be ordering at Butcher and Bee right now?

On the sweet side, the Peach Cobbler; fresh peaches, streusel topping or Dark Chocolate Guinness Pie (it has a pretzel crust, drool).  And on the savory side, you have to try our whipped feta with fermented honey. 

Beyond the Apron - Brody Kimbro

Each month, we’ll chat with one of Nashville’s chefs about what life is like beyond the apron.      


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Brody Kimbro @cookinoutdoors

Chef De Cuisine, Fort Louise

Live: Old Hickory / Work: East Nashville

 

A family man, who's love for the culinary arts is rooted in childhood memories of food, family and fellowship.  Brody Kimbro, Fort Louise's Chef De Cuisine, is bringing a new spin to the East Nashville food scene.  Stop by  and try his favorite menu item, Local Pan Seared Trout, and stay to enjoy the summer evenings on the patio. 

Where do you dine when the apron is off? 

I have young children, so I don’t go out to eat much. On the rare occasion I can find a babysitter brave enough to watch them, I really love Eastland Café. Chef Paul is great and it’s where I really started to take my culinary career seriously. 

Go to spot for drinks?

Honestly, My front porch. I’m not a heavy drinker, but I love sitting on my porch swing and trying out new beers from the growing collection of breweries in Nashville. I recently got turned onto Honky Tonk Brewery and have really been digging their Country Style New England IPA.    

What inspired you to become a chef?

Growing up, the only time we could get my entire family together was with the promise of a free meal. So, the majority of my positive childhood memories are food related. Whether it was in my Uncle’s backyard around the grill, around a campfire, or helping out in our garden I always wanted to be part of creating the meal that brought my family so much joy.

Advice you would you give aspiring chefs?

Don’t give up. When you feel like you might, find a way to hit the reset button and recharge yourself. When I feel a breakdown coming on I go hiking, fishing, and camping with my wife and kids. I always come back feeling inspired and ready to handle whatever obstacle was getting in the way.  

What brought you to Nashville?

I am actually from here. I was born in Knoxville and my parents moved to Sumner County before I was one. I’ve moved around a little, but I’ve been in Middle Tennessee most of my life.

How can Nashville improve?

No more condos! I love that Nashville is growing and there are an infinite amount of new opportunities coming into the city, but it’s hard letting go of the Nashville I grew up in.

Thing you are most excited about at work right now?

The garden out in our backyard and patio season. I’ve always been obsessed with growing my own food and I’m ecstatic I get to bring that love to work. We are a small restaurant and our patio almost doubles our seating capacity. So, I’m excited for the opportunity to reach more people with what I love!

What should people be ordering at Butcher and Bee right now?

My favorite thing on the menu right now is our trout dish. Mainly because I grew up fishing for rainbow trout on the Caney Fork. We’d always stuff the trout with lemon and garlic then wrap it in foil and cook it right on the campfire coals. Then we’d eat boiled peanuts while we waited for it to cook. So, I tried to recreate that feeling in the dish.  

Beyond the Apron - Andrew Rodriguez

Each month, we’ll chat with one of Nashville’s chefs about what life is like beyond the apron.      


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ANDREW RODRIGUEZ @burnt_ends

Executive Chef, Little Octopus   

Live: Mt. Juliet / Work: The Gulch

 

Andrew Rodriguez is no stranger to the culinary game.  His grandfather introduced him to a strong work ethic and a love for cooking at an early age.  After making his mark in culinary school and on the industry in The Big Apple, he moved south.  Now. you can find him refining his Latin inspired menu at Little Octopus in The Gulch. 

Where do you dine when the apron is off?

There are more and more places popping up in Nashville; regardless of that, I have my favorite spots. Rolf & Daughters tops my list of go to places, alongside City House and Henrietta Red. All three places have a casual vibe but create some of the best food in town.

 

Go to spot for drinks?

I’m not a huge cocktail guy; I’m more basic in that aspect. A cold beer and a shot is more my style. Bastion never disappoints, not to mention, the playlist always has a deep cut bumping. With all the local breweries around, there is so much great beer to choose from. Bearded Iris in Germantown produces my favorite selection of beer, hands down.

 

What inspired you to become a chef?

Cooking is in my blood. My grandfather owned a slew of restaurants in the ‘60s and ‘70s in NY. I’ve been working in the industry since I was 18, and the fast pace is something I cannot live without. I cooked prior to culinary school, but it was during school that my instructors noticed my natural cooking ability. They opened the doors and set me on a path to some of NY’s best kitchens.

 

Advice you would you give aspiring chefs?

Without a doubt, this is a true labor of love. The hours will be long, and it will require extensive sacrifice. The most important advice I can give to young people pursuing this is to never stop learning.  On average I buy four cookbooks a month. Product knowledge and remaining current is an essential part to staying relevant in this industry.

 

What brought you to Nashville?

I came down with my family in the summer of 2014. Four months later I was offered a position with Jonathan Waxman to lead Adele’s. I made the move from New York because I saw the potential in the growing culinary scene.

 

How can Nashville improve?

TRAFFIC IS A NIGHTMARE; it seems to get worse daily. If we could just go ahead and increase the roads that would be great.

 

Thing you are most excited about at work right now?

Spring is finally here, and I’m looking forward to all the produce that will be coming into play. The spring menu will allow me to shift the focus more on vegetables.

 

What should people be ordering at Little Octopus?

My absolute favorite dish on the menu is the mushrooms. The base is a Peruvian cheese sauce, topped with hen of the wood mushrooms and cured beef.  The flavor reminds me of a loaded baked potato.